Faculty

Dr. Jeffrey A. Nittrouer
Assistant Professor of Earth Science
nittrouer-at-rice.edu

Post-Doctoral Researchers

My research investigates the fundamental physics of sediment-laden flow and its morphological influence on fluvial system. This science requires understanding scales as small as particles to as large as sedimentary basins. My current study seeks to understand how sediment transport, and elements of morphological change, vary over different environments to create various bedforms, including ripples, dunes, and channel bars, and to evaluate how these bedforms influence large scale morphology of sedimentary systems that  are preserved in the rock record.

My research comingles observational sedimentology and geomorphology with reduced complexity numerical and analytical modeling to understand earth surface processes and how they create sedimentary records.

Graduate Students

The broad aim of my research is evaluating how the physical processes of rivers and deltas shape the surface of Earth. Currently, my research is examining modern sedimentation processes of the Selenga River Delta, Lake Baikal, Russia. In particular, I am exploring the interaction between basin subsidence and the dispersal of gravel, with the aim to couple modern sediment transport processes, as influenced by tectonics, to the construction of basin stratigraphy.

 

 

 

 

Andrew Moodie
(PhD candidate)
andrew.moodie-at-rice.edu
andrewjmoodie.com

The Yellow River is an end-member fluvial system as it is characterized by very suspended sediment concentrations, variable water discharge over annual and decadal timescales, and significant anthropogenic influences. In the lower reaches of the Lower Yellow River, the unique characteristics of the river combine to produce rapid channel bed aggradation that results in frequent overbank flooding and river avulsions. My research seeks to advance the science regarding long-term fluvial-deltaic evolution through comprehensive numerical models of the Yellow River and detailed field observations. A broad aim of this research is to forward model delta growth for sustainable river-engineering practices, and therefore there is application to management of deltaic landscapes globally.

Chenliang Wu
(PhD student)
chenliang.wu-at-rice.edu
cw56-at-rice.edu

The filling history of Carboniferous Shannon Basin (Co. Clare, Ireland) remains mysterious in terms of the relationship between sediment transport mechanics and the resulting stratigraphy despite research for over half a century. I aim to address this gap in our understanding short term (1-100 year time scale) morphodynamics and long term (1000-1000000 year) basin filling mechanisms by combining numerical modeling and field data, so to test the hypothesis that “fluid hydrodynamics of the PRESENT is the KEY to the stratigraphy of the PAST”.

Eric Barefoot
(PhD student)
eric.barefoot-at-rice.edu

I am broadly interested in how small-scale mechanisms manifest and control larger scale processes in river systems, in particular how grain-scale processes ultimately manifest as fractal river planform geometries. I’m also interested in how large-scale drivers like climate change manifest as changes in local scale river processes.

Brandee Carlson
(PhD candidate)
bc15-at-rice.edu

My research focuses on the processes that shape modern coastal systems. My current research investigates the evolution of abandoned deltaic lobes and distributary channels on the Huanghe (Yellow River), China.

Visiting Scholars and Collaborators

Jan Pietron
Department of Physical Geography
Stockholm University, Sweden
jan.pietron-at-natgeo.su.se

Katherine Anarde
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Rice University
kanarde-at-rice.edu

I’m interested in how human activities influence coastal dynamics. My research integrates field experiments with computational models to investigate the hazards associated with changes to coastal barriers and tidal deltas along the Upper Texas Coast due to climate change impacts, tropical storms, and engineering activities. I’m currently working to develop an array of rapid response instrumentation for measuring barrier island overwash and inundation during hurricane attack along the Texas Gulf Coast.

Manuel Bogoni
Department of Environmental and Architectural Engineering
University of Padova, Italy
manuel.bogoni-at-dicea.unipd.it

Undergraduate Students

Garrett Lynch
wgl1-at-rice.edu

Simon Chan
sac8-at-rice.edu

Sam Zapp
smz1-at-rice.edu

Alumni Students

Jorge Lorenzo Trueba
Assistant Professor, Montclair State University
lorenzotruej-at-mail.montclair.edu